Extra-cranial Arteries

The involvement of Extra-cranial Arteries in Migraine

The research on ergots and triptans (the medications designed to abort migraine headaches) indicates that the extent to which the extra cranial arteries pulsate (or throb) during migraine, is directly parallel to a decrease in the intensity of pain. There is a close time-relationship between these drugs and the size (or amplitude) of the pulsations of the extra cranial arteries. This suggests that migraine is caused by the dilation of the extra cranial arteries and that these potent and specific migraine medications decrease the intensity of pain.

Fig 1: Ergotamine decreases the amplitude of pulsation of the superficial temporal artery at the same time that it decreases the intensity of the migraine  headache. Reproduced with permission from Graham and Wolff.

Fig 1: Ergotamine decreases the amplitude of pulsation of the superficial temporal artery at the same time that it decreases the intensity of the migraine headache. Reproduced with permission from Graham and Wolff.

 

Do you take ergots or triptans for migraines or cluster headaches?

When you take any of the below medications, called ergots or triptans, then the painfully distended arteries that occur during migraine or cluster attacks are constricted.

  • Imitrex
  • Imigran
  • Cinie
  • Illument
  • Migriptan
  • Zomig
  • Relpax
  • Maxalt
  • Frova
  • Migard
  • Frovamig
  • Amerge
  • Naramig
  • BMS-180,048
  • Axert
  • Almogran
  • Migranal
  • Cafergot
  • Migergot
  • Migril and
  • Ergomar

Extra-cranial surgery is designed to provide a permanent “triptan effect”. Read more about extra cranial arterial involvement in migraine and extra cranial procedures

The Extracranial Vascular Theory of Migraine – A Great Story Confirmed by the Facts

Recent Advances in the Understanding of Migraine

Migraine Pain – Intercranial or Extracranial?

The extracranial vascular theory of migraine – an artifical controversy

The Role of External Carotid Vasculature in Migraine

Middle Meningeal Artery Dilation in Migraine